Christmas

To Real tree or to Fake tree…..that is the question!

It’s December and millions of people around the world are decorating their homes and putting up the tree. Some prefer to go shopping and bring home a real tree and some prefer to pull out the box and assemble their tree. Which is your preference? Which is the best scenario? I have my own personal opinions but in interest of the popularity, I visited several sites and asked many people……and I don’t think anything has influenced my stand either way, honestly. I was trying to find all the arguments for or against a real or fake tree, here is what I found.

These are the debate points on the pro’s and con’s of a fake or real tree:

  • Environment
  • Safety
  • Cost
  • Experience
  • Look
  • Effort

Sometimes it simply comes down to family tradition! So, here are the arguments for each:

Pro’s for having a real tree:

  • It’s the Greener choice. According to the NYTimes, Christmas trees are crops grown on farms, like lettuce or corn. They are not cut down from wild forests on a large scale, said Bert Cregg, an expert in Christmas tree production and forestry at Michigan State University. A five- or six-foot tree takes just under a decade to grow, and once it’s cut down, the farmer will generally plant at least one in its place. The trees provide many benefits to the environment as they grow, cleaning the air and providing watersheds and habitats for wildlife. They grow best on rolling hills that are often unsuitable for other crops and, of course, they are biodegradable. In addition, buying local supports the local farmers and they can be recycled at the end of the season. (via NYTimes article.)
  • They look and smell better.
  • The experience of the family picking out the perfect tree is fun.
  • All real trees are unique. No two trees are the same.

Con’s for having a real tree:

  • They can become a fire hazard. If you don’t keep your tree watered, the tree will dry out increasing the risk of a fire.
  • Allergies can be troublesome with real pine trees in the house.
  • Its more expensive to buy a new tree every year. According to a study by Square and the National Christmas Tree Association, real trees cost an average of $73. (Via https://squareup.com/us/en/press/christmas-tree-report%20)
  • More upkeep to clean up the needles and sap that the tree leaves behind.
  • Consumers have found spiders and other insects in their real tree after they have it in their house. Ewwww

Pro’s for having a fake tree:

  • Fake trees are more cost effective. They do have a higher cost initially, but they can be used year after year for approx. 9 years.
  • They are easier to maintain. They don’t require watering, or needle cleanup.
  • They come in all kinds of fun options; Colors, pre-lit (saves a big hassle there), Fiber optic, metallic, snow covered, the list goes on.
  • Having a fake tree is safer. They are not flammable.
  • They are allergy friendly.

Con’s for having a fake tree:

  • Fake trees look the same every year. Of course, you can change the decorations but the tree will always be the same.
  • Some find it boring to assemble a tree from a box vs the Nostalgic fun of going out with the family to pick it out together.
  • Fake trees don’t have the wonderful Pine aroma.

These are all good talking points but I offer nation wide statistics:

  • On average, one of every 32 reported home Christmas tree fires resulted in a death, compared to an average of one death per 143 total reported home fires.
  • Four of every five Christmas tree fires occurred in December or January.
  • In one-quarter (26%) of the Christmas tree fires and 80% of the deaths, some type of heat source, such as a candle or equipment, was too close to the tree.
  • According to CBS News, 27 million real Christmas trees were purchased last year. Sure that’s a lot, but 80% of American households put up an artificial tree, and that’s a lot more!

So, I ask you…….which do you prefer? Real or fake? Leave me a comment and attach a picture of your tree.

Until next time….

Renee

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